Get e-book Wine Guide For Lovers (Wine Companion and Tasting Education Series Book 10)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Wine Guide For Lovers (Wine Companion and Tasting Education Series Book 10) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Wine Guide For Lovers (Wine Companion and Tasting Education Series Book 10) book. Happy reading Wine Guide For Lovers (Wine Companion and Tasting Education Series Book 10) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Wine Guide For Lovers (Wine Companion and Tasting Education Series Book 10) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Wine Guide For Lovers (Wine Companion and Tasting Education Series Book 10) Pocket Guide.

My Wishlist Sign In Join. Write a review. Add to Wishlist. In Stock. Unable to Load Delivery Dates. Enter an Australian post code for delivery estimate. Link Either by signing into your account or linking your membership details before your order is placed. Description Customer Reviews 2 Product Details Click on the cover image above to read some pages of this book! Booktopia Comments Order this or any title featured in our Booktoberfest Showcase for your chance to win a year's supply of books!

The Wine Bible, Revised. Everything Happens for a Riesling. This Is Not a Wine Guide. Australian Wine Vintages Halliday Special Vintage Release Collection. Native Wine Grapes of Italy. Varietal Wines. Champagne A secret history. Hunter Wine A History. To view its report, see:. The goals of the new certification program are to enhance transparency, encourage statewide participation and advance the entire California wine industry toward best practices in environmental stewardship, conservation of natural resources and socially equitable business practices.

Three years in the making, the certification program is the first statewide program available to both wineries and vineyards. Gallo Winery. To be eligible for the certification program, participants meet a set of 58 prerequisites that are among the best management practices in the Code of Sustainable Winegrowing Practices Self-Assessment Workbook. The prerequisites include practices that protect air and water quality, conserve water, promote energy efficiency and reduced pesticide use, and preserve ecosystems and animal habitat, among many others.

CSWA offers educational workshops, resources and tools to assist wineries and growers through these various stages. Onsite audits take place the first year and then every third year after that, and involve activities such as internal inspections and verification of corrective and preventative action processes. While process-based certification is the approach that will be used at the launch of the program, CSWA is initiating a project to develop industry-wide metrics to measure and track sustainability performance.

Once the metrics are in place, they will tie into the certification program and certified participants will need to consider industry-wide targets when creating action plans. The metrics will also focus on industry efforts around best management practice development and sustainability tool creation. Because of current eco-label protocols and discussions by both industry and government on this issue, use of logo and claims on wine bottles is not permitted at this time.

They can complete self-assessments, attend workshops and communicate that they participate in the educational Sustainable Winegrowing Program. Seventeen companies have received certification for some or all of their vineyard and winery operations after participating in a pilot program to test the certification requirements and offer feedback.

The California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance also presented its Wine Community Sustainability Report at the January 13 launch event in San Francisco, indicating that most of the goals have been achieved or significant progress has been made. For participants who have self-assessed their operations against the best management practices in 14 areas from the Code of Sustainable Winegrowing Self-Assessment Workbook , the report indicates that a majority of the practices showed an improvement in average self-assessment scores since the report.

Areas identified as opportunities for improvement include energy efficiency, materials handling, waste reduction and environmentally preferred purchasing. Practices receiving scores in the middle ground are vineyard water management, pest management, winery water conservation and quality, human resources, neighbors and community, and air quality. The 1, California vineyard and winery organizations in the Sustainable Winegrowing Program represent a 66 percent increase in the number of wine businesses participating since the Sustainability Report.

Vineyard Data Comparison. In addition to releasing a second edition and web-based version of the Code of Sustainable Winegrowing Self-Assessment Workbook in and targeted education events, CSWA has developed new resources and tools to further disseminate useful information on sustainable winegrowing practices, including the following, all of which are available online at www. The full Wine Community Sustainability Report is available online at www.

The next Sustainability Report will be published in Complete survey results are detailed in the report titled, " Understanding Adoption and Impacts of Sustainable Practices: Sustainable Winegrowing Program Participants' Survey ," and is available online. About 60 percent of the surveyed winegrowers reported using 10 or more of the 16 environmentally friendly farming practices included in the study. The six most-used practices, adopted by 80 percent or more of the growers, include. Winegrowers offered a variety of reasons for adopting these vineyard practices, with the most common being concern about the environmental impacts of their farming operations, including conservation of natural resources, such as soil.

The economic benefits of the practices are important to growers. Monitoring for pests and diseases; monitoring water use; planting cover crops; and reducing tillage are all associated with significant cost savings. Several practices, such as leaf pulling, also improve the quality of winegrapes.

Tasting Pleasure: Confessions of a Wine Lover

Almost half of the growers expressed an interest in adopting alternative energy sources such as solar or wind powered systems, but high capital costs and potentially long payback periods are mentioned as deterrents. Many are interested in releasing beneficial insects or planting more habitat such as hedgerows, but feel constrained by lack of knowledge and experience. Finding viable alternatives to chemical weed control and improving water conservation are also high on the priority list of those surveyed.

Many of the grower participants praised the Sustainable Winegrowing Program for helping them learn about more sustainable farming practices. Constructive suggestions offered for the future direction of the program include an emphasis on increasing public awareness about issues of sustainability in farming and encouraging the purchase of winegrapes and wine produced with sustainable winegrowing practices.

The NFWF requested the study to learn the motivations for why California winegrowers use environmentally sustainable farming practices, the extent to which they use these practices and the impacts of these practices on their vineyard operations. NFWF believes the survey information can be useful to growers who have not yet tried these sustainable practices, those who have already adopted the practices, program planners and educators in this field, and policy-makers interested in agriculture.

Survey participants were winegrowers who participated in the CSWA program. In early , CSWA also plans to publish a comprehensive Progress Report on the California wine community's adoption and target goals of the best practices related to the page Code of Sustainable Winegrowing workbook.

More than 5, vintners and growers have attended targeted education workshops. The California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance, established by Wine Institute and the California Association of Winegrape Growers, has released a new video to show highlights of its program''s earth-friendly practices embraced by the state''s vintners and winegrape growers. The term "sustainability" has a specific meaning for California''s vintners and winegrape growers. At the heart of California''s sustainability movement is the Code of Sustainable Winegrowing, a chapter workbook that lays out best practices for soil, ecosystems, air quality, pest control, water conservation, recycling, energy efficiency and wine quality, among many other practices.

The Code has formalized socially and environmentally responsible ways to farm and make wine from the ground to the glass. Department of Agriculture, Risk Management Agency. The page user-friendly guide demonstrates how adopting sustainable methods reduces risk and can be an effective management strategy to enhance the long-term viability of businesses.

The guide is available online at: www. Moreover, crop insurance alone does not fully buffer risks to guarantee business success, and additional strategies are needed to minimize losses. The new guide recommends key practices from the California Code of Sustainable Winegrowing Practices Workbook and other sources to reduce exposure. Economic, environmental, and social concerns are addressed, revealing how these types of risks are often interrelated.

Applying the practices in the guide constitutes an integrated systems approach. The top risks covered in the guide are water scarcity, impaired water quality, decreased soil quality, diminished air quality and climate change, increased labor costs, rising energy costs, pest outbreaks, aberrant weather and unexpected market challenges. The guide uses best practices from multiple sources including industry, academic and government experts to address water conservation and efficiency, water quality protection, soil conservation and management, air quality protection, human resource management, energy conservation and efficiency, integrated pest management, weather monitoring and preventive planning, selection of appropriate insurance policies and tools, and proactive business planning and management.

CSWA''s Sustainable Winegrowing Program SWP is a ground-breaking statewide initiative that encourages and enables winegrowers and vintners to adopt the highest standards of sustainable practices. The document provides tools for self-assessment and documentation of a wide range of practices related to water and energy use, including steps to reduce source water use in cleaning and sanitation; minimize use of cleaning products and other chemicals; decrease the volume and strength of wastewater produced and associated energy required for treatment; and minimize the water and energy needed for heating and cooling operations.

Common methods for land application of process wastewater are described and basic system design guidelines are presented. A pilot workshop was held at J. Lohr Winery in Paso Robles on June 11, Three additional workshops will be held throughout Northern California. Helena from am - pm at Trinchero Winery, St. Helena HWY, St. For a pdf copy of the guide and associated excel-based worksheets, contact info sustainablewinegrowing.

A comprehensive workbook of best practices was developed, and over educational workshops have been held throughout California to encourage expansion of the practices. The program has earned the California wine community numerous awards and a reputation as the wine world''s leader in sustainability. Wine Institute and the California Association of Winegrape Growers established CSWA in , a c 3 non-profit organization to assist with implementation of the program.

The document gives wineries of all sizes the tools for self-assessment to make improvements in environmental performance and to lower overall production costs for water and energy use. These practices include steps to reduce source water use in cleaning and sanitation; minimize use of cleaning products and other chemicals; decrease the volume and strength of wastewater produced and associated energy required for treatment; minimize the water and energy needed for heating and cooling operations; and optimize the effectiveness of land application systems for wastewater treatment.

For details on post-harvest winery water workshops and other sustainability educational events, visit California Sustainable Wine-growing Alliance to view the workshop calendar. The first winery water workshop was held in Paso Robles in June at J. Lohr Winery. For a PDF copy of the guide and associated excel-based worksheets, contact info sustainablewinegrowing. Established in , the Wine Institute is the public policy advocacy group of 1, California wineries and affiliated businesses that initiates and advocates state, federal and interna-tional public policy to enhance the environment for the responsible production, consumption and enjoyment of wine.

The organization also works to enhance the economic and environmental health of its communities and the state through its leadership in sustainable winegrowing and winemaking practices. Wine Institute introduced the Code of Sustainable Winegrowing Program in conjunction with the California Association of Winegrape Growers in and established the California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance in to implement the program. California growers and vintners subscribe to California''s Sustainable Winegrowing Program SWP , which establishes eco-friendly standards and practices from ground to glass. Solar panels and wind turbines are becoming as much a part of the wine country landscape as grapevines as California growers and vintners quickly embrace alternative energy sources, including biodegradable fuel -- produced from vegetable oils and animal fats -- to power farm equipment and "on road" transport motor vehicles.

Sheep and goats and chickens - oh my! Winegrowers use sheep, goats, chickens, falcons, owls, dogs, beneficial insects and other creatures to provide a low-impact, natural method to cultivate vineyards and manage pests. This year more Americans than ever will re-examine how their lifestyles and choices impact the environment.

Global warming, greenhouse gases and carbon footprint have become household terms, and consumer groups, government agencies, and businesses are working on ways to preserve the land, air, water and other natural resources. Protecting the environment is a priority for the California wine industry, and has been for years. Vintners and growers made a formal commitment to implement sustainable practices by establishing in a best practices program named the Code of Sustainable Winegrowing.

In honor of Earth Day , California''s two largest trade associations - Wine Institute, representing the state''s vintners, and the California Association of Winegrape Growers CAWG , representing its winegrape growers - have developed the "Top 10 Reasons California Wines are an Eco-Friendly Choice," a list to inform consumers about where and how their wines and foods are grown. California wineries use "green" building and materials - straw bales, rammed earth, earthen plaster, recycled lumber -- techniques and designs that take energy conservation and long-term environmental impact into consideration.

California vineyards are designed with the larger ecosystem in mind, preserving vernal pools, oak woodlands, and other wildlife habitats and creating nest boxes for owls, raptors and other beneficial birds. California winegrowers are at the forefront of habitat restoration and preservation efforts, working with government agencies to establish conservation easements and restore watersheds.

California winegrowers use cover crops and compost in the vineyards to enrich healthy soils with biomass and vibrant populations of microbes and worms and to prevent erosion and attract helpful insects that prey on pests. Dozens of California vineyards and wineries have employee-run recycling and solid waste management programs. California winegrowers have adopted water conservation practices, including drip irrigation systems that use technology to sense soil moisture and monitor plant stress, thereby determining the precise level of water and timing of water applications.

California winegrowers have committed themselves to measuring and reducing their greenhouse gas footprint by working with international partners to develop the Wine Industry Greenhouse Gas Accounting Protocol and sharing the accounting tool worldwide at no charge. They are also increasing their energy efficiency by insulating tanks, installing new lighting fixtures and adopting innovative new packaging. With increased attention to climate change and greenhouse gas GHG emissions and offsets, the goal of the project partners is to provide a free, easy-to-use, wine industry specific, greenhouse gas GHG protocol and calculator that will measure the carbon footprints of winery and vineyard operations of all sizes.

Examples of winery GHG tracking needs include meeting future regulatory requirements, such as AB 32, which requires the state of California to reach carbon emission levels by the year Wine Institute and its global partnership of wine associations contracted Provisor Pt Ltd, a consultancy firm with expertise in resource accounting in the wine industry, to develop the international wine industry protocol, based on the Greenhouse Gas Protocol set by the World Resources Institute.

Following this methodology, the group determined three "scopes" of emissions in the wine life cycle to be included in product footprint calculations. The protocol forms the basis for the accompanying GHG calculator, which serves as a practical application of the protocol. The international partners engaged their winery members in the development of the protocol and calculator, which will continue to be updated and refined as new information becomes available.

The GHG protocol and version 1. Future plans include creating a web-based calculator, integrating the calculator into the California Sustainable Winegrowing Program, and organizing workshops across the state to provide climate change information and technical assistance on use of the tool. Advancing the practices for sustainability is also a prime motivator for the industry's vintners and growers," said Chris Savage, Director of Environmental Affairs at E. Established in , the Wine Institute is the public policy advocacy group of over 1, California wineries and affiliated businesses that initiates and advocates state, federal and international public policy to enhance the environment for the responsible production, consumption and enjoyment of wine.

The Wine Institute membership represents 85 percent of U. The project will involve conducting interviews of growers to explore the motivations for adopting sustainable practices as well as perceived benefits, barriers and incentives to adoption.

Meet the Wine Companion tasting team | Wine reviewing | Wine Companion

Results will be used to increase and speed adoption by the California wine community and other agricultural sectors. The project will extend proven, reduced-risk pest management strategies from the Sustainable Winegrowing Workbook to winegrape, table grape and raisin growers throughout California. Using 10 demonstration vineyards and a series of 20 educational events, the Grape Pest Management Alliance intends to achieve widespread adoption of economically viable integrated pest management practices that reduce pesticide risks to air and water.

The grant calls for a 20 percent increase in winegrape performance, compared to current sustainability criteria, and a grower survey to capture project impact on table grape and raisin acreage. CSWA''s Sustainable Winegrowing Program SWP is a ground-breaking initiative that encourages and enables winegrowers and vintners to adopt the highest standards of sustainable practices.

The agreement will be used in part to develop a handbook and hold workshops that will present best practices, resources and case studies, including data on the financial implications of adopting risk management strategies. Offering risk management education is part of CSWA''s mission to promote sustainable winegrowing practices that help vintners and winegrowers remain economically viable. The project will involve collaboration between industry and academic partners to examine data and research pertaining to emissions and offsets of greenhouse gases to better understand the wine, table and raisin grape sector''s greenhouse gas "footprint.

The climate change partnership is an example of this spirit as well as being an efficient use of resources," said Robert P. However, the development of new tools and research information will put us ahead of the curve in making informed decisions for the future," said Karen Ross, President of the California Association of Winegrape Growers.

CSWA''s Sustainable Winegrowing Program SWP is a ground-breaking project that encourages and enables winegrowers and vintners to adopt the highest standards of sustainable practices. The CDFA grant information can be found at:.

See a Problem?

The grant recognizes the uniquely cooperative approach California wineries and winegrape growers are taking to conserve vital air, water, soil and energy resources, and will allow the Alliance, with the assistance of the California Association of Winegrape Growers CAWG and Wine Institute, to help growers and vintners learn about, access and benefit from market-based conservation opportunities. The CIG-funded project will build upon the Alliance''s award-winning track record in sustainable practices education and outreach to help growers and vintners understand and use environmental accounting tools that document conservation outcomes for use in market-based conservation approaches.

The online software system used by the Alliance will be enhanced so the wine community can more easily manage information on resource conservation practices to participate in greenhouse gas and water quality trading opportunities, energy and water use reduction incentive programs, and alternative compliance with new regulatory programs addressing air and water quality. Added Robert P. California''s Sustainable Winegrowing Program SWP is a ground-breaking program that encourages and enables winegrowers and vintners to adopt the highest standards of sustainable practices.

The California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance CSWA , established by Wine Institute and the California Association of Winegrape Growers CAWG , today unveiled its Progress Report indicating a 24 percent increase since in the number of California wineries and vineyard businesses working to adopt practices that are sensitive to the environment and society at large. Industry leaders presented the results at a press event held at Fort Mason in San Francisco, attended by the media, government officials, members of the wine community from throughout the state and other key stakeholders.

The report indicated that 1, vineyard and winery enterprises in the CSWA program have evaluated their sustainable practices for 33 percent of California's , total winegrape acres, and 53 percent of the state's total annual wine production of million cases. More specifically, winegrowers increased their performance for 31 of 38 pest management criteria by nearly 8 percent. Their passion for making the finest quality wine is tied directly to the state's climate and soil which are ideal for wine.

Preserving valuable natural resources and being a good neighbor are part of the legacy that they are passing on to future generations," said Robert P. Wine Institute and CAWG launched the California Sustainable Winegrowing Program in to help the state earn a reputation as the world leader in the adoption of sustainable winegrowing practices. The two groups created CSWA to implement the program with the goals of promoting environmental stewardship and social responsibility in the state's wine community.

Pest management performance was measured and documented in the Sustainability Report, and then measured again after CSWA conducted 75 educational workshops throughout California focusing on this area. Performance improved for 31 of the 38 pest management criteria by nearly 8 percent.

Grants from the American Farmland Trust helped support the wine industry's effort to increase statewide winegrower performance in pest management.

The Halliday Cellar Door - Steve Webber Interview (De Bortoli Wines)

The centerpiece of the California Sustainable Winegrowing Program is the best management practices self-assessment workbook, of which the second edition is now being released. Growers and vintners assess and report their viticultural and wine production practices, using 14 workbook chapters of types of sustainable practices from the ground to the glass.

The program provides participants confidential, customized reports to compare their practices with regional and statewide results to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement. The most significant addition to the second edition is a new Air Quality Chapter, developed with the guidance of a vintner-grower committee of 50 experts as well as external reviewers.


  • Halliday Sip Series.
  • Swingers: Learning To Swing.
  • Seeing Justice.
  • To Die For (Spark of Magic).
  • Watch Next.
  • With your existing account from...!
  • Tammy finally brushes her teeth (Fun Learning Kids Book Collection 1)?

The new chapter was created with matching funds from the U. The grant was also used to hold workshops and establish air and water quality demonstration sites in more than 10 vineyards throughout California to showcase innovative technologies and practices. The winegrowing industry should be commended for taking the lead to find solutions that protect the environment while rewarding quality wine production," said Daniel Mountjoy, Assistant State Conservationist for Field Operations for NRCS. An additional element to the program is a newly revised web site at www. The new online system allows participants to link to other web-based resources and develop and save action plans for improving practices.

Exhausted soils and misuse of the land and waters contribute to less productive vineyards. The California Association of Winegrape Growers was founded in with the mission to provide industry leadership to advocate public policies, research and education programs and trade positions that enhance the business of growing California winegrapes.

CAWG's membership represents the growers of approximately 60 percent of the total annual grape crush. The Wine Institute is the association of more than California wineries and affiliated businesses dedicated to initiating and advocating state, federal and international public policy to enhance the environment for the responsible consumption and enjoyment of wine.

Wine Institute's membership accounts for about 95 percent of California's wine production and 85 percent of U. The first two workshops will be held in Napa Valley from a. Details on additional wine industry workshops to be offered in will be provided at a later date. The energy workshops are being held in response to findings in the California wine community's Sustainability Report, which provided results on the industry's adoption of sustainable winegrowing practices. The report indicated that energy use was an area that offered wineries and vineyards opportunities for improvement.

Given the potential vulnerability and increasing costs of energy supplies, participation is expected to be high. The workshop content includes energy evaluation and planning strategies, best practices for energy management in vineyards and wineries, and renewable energy opportunities. The workshops will conclude with participants developing an action plan for improving practices as well as self-assessment ratings in the Energy Efficiency chapter of the Code of Sustainable Winegrowing Workbook.

The energy workshops will augment other workshops on topics such as integrated pest management, ecosystem management, and air and water quality, being planned by CSWA for late fall and early as part of the California wine community's Sustainable Winegrowing Program. Visit the Workshops section of this website to view the workshop calendar, registration details and further information. The prestigious award, named on behalf of the founding Chairman of CCEEB recognizes organizations and individuals that exemplify the principles of environmental and economic balance.

CSWA is a c 3 educational nonprofit foundation established by Wine Institute and the California Association of Winegrape Growers to support widespread adoption of sustainable winegrowing practices. A prominent feature of the sustainable winegrowing program is the collaborative effort in its development and implementation by vintners, growers, regional trade associations, regulators, academics, environmental and social equity groups and other stakeholders.

The result has been more than sustainable winegrowing workshops in all the major winegrowing regions of California. The report described California's sustainable winegrowing strengths and opportunities for improvement, and set new goals to increase adoption of environmentally friendly practices.

Based on the report findings, CSWA is planning new workshops targeted at the most challenging areas and will issue follow-up reports tracking the California wine community's progress in the years to come. Workshops have been offered on energy-efficient practices, water conservation and integrated pest management, for instance.

The program encourages responsiveness to both local communities and growing consumer trends, keeping California's wine industry viable in an increasingly competitive global market. The award, a handcrafted gold, sterling silver and bronze sculpture, symbolizes the need to balance CCEEB's tripartite coalition of business, labor and public members. Thrupp, who has more than 20 years experience in sustainable agriculture, will also maintain her current position as Manager of Organic Development and North Coast Grower Representative at Fetzer Vineyards.

Thrupp assumes the position previously held by Dr. Dlott will continue to provide strategic advice and technical services to CSWA. She has published numerous books and articles. The GEELA is California's highest and most prestigious environmental honor and recognizes individuals, organizations and businesses that have demonstrated leadership and made notable contributions in conserving the state's natural resources, protecting and enhancing the environment, and building public-private partnerships.

CSWA is a c 3 educational nonprofit organization established by Wine Institute and the California Association of Winegrape Growers to support widespread adoption of sustainable winegrowing practices. A prominent feature of the CSWA Sustainable Winegrowing Program is the active participation of vintners, growers, regional trade associations, regulators, academics, environmental and social equity groups and other stakeholders in its development and implementation of the program.

Unique Wine Gifts for Wine Lovers

The result of this collaborative effort by CSWA has been more than 90 sustainable winegrowing workshops in 24 counties covering all the major winegrowing regions of California. The participants contributed benchmark data measuring the level of adoption of sustainable practices in their vineyard and winery operations. The report described California's sustainable winegrowing strengths and opportunities for improvement and set new goals to increase adoption of environmentally friendly practices. Based on the report findings, CSWA is planning new sustainable winegrowing workshops targeted at the most challenging areas and will issue follow-up reports tracking the California wine community's progress in the years to come.

Through this collaborative effort between vintners and growers, sustainability is a concept that has now entered the mainstream thinking and doing of the California wine community. The California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance CSWA , established in by Wine Institute and the California Association of Winegrape Growers CAWG to promote environmental stewardship and social responsibility in the California wine community, today presented its first report measuring the level of sustainable practices among vintners and growers on a statewide basis.

The report is the first time an entire industry sector has used a common assessment tool to document the adoption of sustainable practices among its members and reported the results publicly. The presentation was held at Fort Mason's Golden Gate Room and attended by wine industry stakeholders, government officials, and members of academia, the environmental community and the media. Wine Institute and CAWG initiated the California Sustainable Winegrowing Program in to help the state earn a reputation as the world leader in the adoption of sustainable winegrowing practices.

More than 70 workshops have been held throughout California to support the industry's implementation and expansion of sustainable practices. Workshop participants evaluate their vineyard and winery operations using a page workbook of best management practices, developed by a Joint Committee of 50 members from Wine Institute, CAWG and other key stakeholders.

The evaluation results collected from the workshops are contained in the report, and represent about 40 percent of the California's million case production and 25 percent of its , wine acres. To support the Sustainable Winegrowing Program, the U. This will include educational materials, such as a new air quality chapter in the Code of Sustainable Winegrowing workbook and the establishment of air quality and water quality demonstration sites throughout California to showcase innovative technologies and practices.

Consumers will appreciate our efforts in being responsible stewards of the land and good neighbors, while maintaining the long-term viability of businesses that contribute significantly to the state's economy," said Robert P. Koch, president and CEO of Wine Institute, the public policy advocacy group for nearly California wineries and affiliated businesses.

We are in the process of analyzing the data gathered from the workbook assessments and determining where we should focus our next efforts," said Karen Ross, president of the California Association of Winegrape Growers. The results indicate widespread adoption of sustainable management practices in many critical areas including: water conservation, pesticide risk reduction and soil management.

It also points out areas that need to be addressed such as energy conservation, material handling and environmentally preferred purchasing. Dealing with these issues will require time, money, innovation and, in some cases, outside expertise, new technologies, an improved regulatory framework, and partnerships. The department gave two of its eight awards to these organizations this year to give rare public recognition to those who develop and promote methods for pest management that reduce the risks associated with using traditional chemical approaches.

The Code promotes best management practices for protecting the environment and enhancing relations with employees, neighbors and local communities, while remaining economically competitive. Workbook chapters provide specific guidelines for managing pests with a broad-based combination of biological, cultural and chemical tools, including encouraging beneficial plants and animals that make it difficult for pests to survive. Not only is it the right thing to do, but it provides best practices to reinforce California's emphasis on making high quality wine," says Wine Institute President and CEO Robert P.

Wine Institute and CAWG have distributed Code workbooks and held 65 workshops throughout the state to help the California wine community use the workbook's resources.

Shopping Cart

At the workshops, participants review the workbook chapters and submit self-assessments that scientifically measure the practices of their vineyard and winery operations. The confidential self-evaluations forms provide data to track the industry's progress in adopting the sustainable winegrowing guidelines.

Introduced on October 29, , the Code of Sustainable Winegrowing Practices program has exceeded its first year goal of 10 percent industry participation. Self-assessments collected to date represent 29 percent of the state's winegrape acreage, and 53 percent of the state's wine production. We will use the collected data to benchmark the industry's impact on the state's natural and human resources in order to track our progress in the coming years.

The information also will help inform public officials and communities about the positive work the wine industry is doing to enhance the environment," says Karen Ross, president of CAWG, an organization whose growers represent about 60 percent of the state's total annual grape crush. Wine Institute and the California Association of Winegrape Growers CAWG today introduced to the California wine community a code of best management practices and accompanying page workbook promoting social responsibility and environmental stewardship. Named the "Code of Sustainable Winegrowing Practices," the program is being unveiled to California's vintners and growers as a voluntary self-assessment tool with information on how to conserve natural resources, protect the environment and enhance relationships with employees, neighbors and local communities.

In an increasingly competitive global marketplace, it is in our interest to farm responsibly with the best science available," said John De Luca, president and CEO of the Wine Institute, a public policy advocacy group, representing more than California wineries. Wine Institute and CAWG will be working closely with regional groups throughout the state to hold educational workshops to help the industry adopt the Code. The workbook includes 13 chapters of practical guidelines, including information on winegrape growing, soil management, pest management, ecosystems management, water and energy conservation, materials handling and human resources.

The workbook has a built-in scientific measurement system which will help track the industry's progress in adopting the guidelines. It is really the first of its kind," said Karen Ross, president of CAWG, an organization whose growers represent about 60 percent of the total annual grape crush.

If we are going to maintain a winegrape growing operation, we have to be able to sell and compete against foreign competition. More than 50 members of the Wine Institute and the California Association of Winegrape Growers worked on the document for two years. Environmentalists, regulators, university educators and social equity groups provided expertise to the project as well. Project organizers say that the workbook will be updated periodically to reflect current industry advancements.

We believe the wine community will embrace the Code because it is the right thing to do and improves wine quality at the same time," said Michael Honig, chairman of the committee that developed the workbook and general manager of Honig Vineyard and Winery.